The Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC)

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Crisis! What Crisis! The Multiple Dimensions of the Zimbabwean Crisis argues that the Zimbabwean crisis is in fact a series of crises. From infrastructural problems and disease to a depreciating currency and an increasing muscular militarism, the citizens of Zimbabwe have faced an ongoing struggle to survive. The book explores the resilience of a people as they navigate the multiple challenges they face in the country of their birth. In an inter-disciplinary approach, the authors of Crisis! What Crisis! engage with issues as diverse as resource politics and livelihoods, migration and disembedment, language, and humour to demonstrate the ingenious ways in which citizens mediate the crisis. Topically, the book explores how social media offers a subversive space that flies in the face of increasing restrictions placed on conventional media within Zimbabwe and the governments aggressive efforts to suppress freedom of speech and spread their nationalist agenda. The book concludes with a sobering reflection on the past and what the future might hold.

Product information

Format : 168mm x 235mm (Soft Cover)
Pages : 288
ISBN 10 : 978-07969-2383-7
ISBN 13 : 978-07969-2383-7
Publish Year : 2012
Rights : World Rights

List of figures and tables
Foreword
Preface

INTRODUCTION: Perspectives of the Zimbabwean crises Sarah Chiumbu and Muchaparara Musemwa

Acronyms and abbreviations

RESOURCE POLITICS AND LIVELIHOODS

Chapter 1: Perpetuating colonial legacies: The postcolonial state, water crises and the outbreak of disease in Harare, Zimbabwe, 19802009
Muchaparara Musemwa

Chapter 2: Remittances and household livelihood strategies in Glen Norah, Harare
Tatenda Mukwedeya

Chapter 3: Negotiating the crisis: Mobile phones and the informal economy in Zimbabwe
Sarah Chiumbu and Richard Nyamanhindi

MIGRATION AND DISEMBEDMENT

Chapter 4: Zimbabwe's global citizens in 'Harare north': Livelihood strategies of Zimbabweans in the United Kingdom
Beacon Mbiba

Chapter 5: Escaping home: The case of ethnicity and formal education in the migration of Zimbabweans during the Zimbabwean 'crisis'
Thabisani Ndlovu

Chapter 6: Negotiating the ZimbabweMozambique border: The pursuit of survival by Mutares poor, 20002008
Fidelis Duri

MEDIATING THE CRISIS

Chapter 7: Linguistic negotiation of the Zimbabwean crises
Maxwell Kadenge

Sarah Chiumbu is a lecturer and Head of Department of the Department of Media Studies at the University of Witwatersrand.

Fidelis Duri is a PhD student in the Department of History at the University of Witwatersrand.

Levi Kabwato is a journalist, writer and researcher based in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Maxwell Kadenge is a lecturer in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Witwatersrand.

Beacon Mbiba is a Senior Lecturer in Urban Policy and International Development and Project Leader in Planning in Developing and Transitional Regions at Oxford Brookes University, United Kingdom.

Alois Mlambo is a Professor of History in the Department of Historical and Heritage Studies at the University of Pretoria.

David B. Moore is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Development Studies University of Johannesburg, South Africa.

Dumisani Moyo is a Programme Manager at Open Society Initiative of Southern Africa, regional advocacy and grant-making organization based in Johannesburg.

Tatenda Mukwedeya is a PhD student in the Sociology of Work Project (SWOP) based in the School of Social Sciences at the University of Witwatersrand.

Jennifer Musangi is a PhD student at the Wits Institute for Social Research, University of Witwatersrand.

Grace Musila is a Senior Lecturer in English Literature at the University of Stellenbosch.

Muchaparara Musemwa is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of History at University of Witwatersrand.

Thabisani Ndlovu is the Deputy Director of the International Human Rights Exchange Programme (IHRE), a joint project of Bard College in the USA and the University of Witwatersrand.

Richard Nyamanhindi is a writer and researcher based in Harare, Zimbabwe.

Brian Raftopoulos is a Director of Research and Advocacy at the Solidarity Peace Trust and a Visiting Professor and Mellon Senior Research Mentor at the Centre for Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape.

Tim Scarnecchia is an Associate Professor in the Department of History at Kent University, USA.

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