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Media  And  Citizenship

How central are the media to the functioning of democracy? Is democracy primarily about citizens using their vote? Does the expression of their voice necessarily empower citizens? Media and Citizenship challenges some assumptions about the relationship between the media and democracy in highly unequal societies like South Africa. In a post-apartheid society where an enfranchised majority is still unable to fundamentally practise their citizenship and experiences marginalisation on a daily basis, notions like listening and belonging may be more useful ways of thinking about the role of the media. In this context, protest is taken seriously as a form of political expression and the media’s role is foregrounded as actively seeking out the voices of those on the margins of society. Through a range of case studies, the contributors show how listening, both as a political concept and as a form of practice, has transformative and even radical potential for both emerging and established democracies.

Product information

Format : 235mm x 168mm (Soft Cover)
Pages : 256
ISBN 13 : 978-0-7969-2556-5
Publish Year : August 2017
Rights : World Rights

Preface

Introduction
    Anthea Garman and Herman Wasserman


Part 1: The media–citizenship nexus

1 Citizens and journalists: The possibilities of co-creating the democracy we want
    Anthea Garman and Herman Wasserman

2 Listening: A normative approach to transform media and democracy
    Tanja Dreher

3 Democracy and political participation: The ambivalence of the Web
    Peter Dahlgren


Part 2: The media–democracy problematic

4 Speaking power’s truth: South African media in the service of the suburbs
    Steven Friedman

5 ‘Back to the people’ journalism: Journalists as public storytellers
    Harry C Boyte

6 A better life for all? Consumption and citizenship in post-apartheid media culture
    Mehita Iqani

7 ‘Don’t raise your voice. Improve your argument’: Reason, emotion and affect in the post-apartheid public sphere
    Steven Robins

8 The tale of two publics: Media, political representation and citizenship in Hout Bay, Cape Town
    Laurence Piper, Bettina von Lieres and Fiona Anciano

9 ‘Non-poor only’: Culture jamming and the limits of free speech in South Africa
    Adam Haupt


Part 3: Acts of citizenship

10 Could a ‘Noongarpedia’ form the basis for an emerging form of citizenship in the age of new media?
    Len Collard, John Hartley, Kim Scott, Niall Lucy and Clint Bracknell, with Jennifer Buchanan and Ingrid Cumming

11 The media, Equal Education and school learners: ‘Political listening’ in the South African education crisis
    Azwihangwisi Mufamadi and Anthea Garman

12 Innocence: A free pass into the moral commonweal
    Yves Vanderhaeghen

13 We are not the ‘born frees’: The real political and civic lives of eight young South Africans
    Vanessa Malila


Contributors

Index

Media

Anthea Garman is an associate professor and deputy head of the School of Journalism and Media Studies and editor of the Rhodes Journalism Review. She holds a PhD from Wits University and her publications include the monograph Antjie Krog and the Post-Apartheid Public Sphere - Speaking Poetry to Power, published by UKZN Press.

Herman Wasserman is Professor of Media Studies and Director of the Centre for Film and Media Studies at the University of Cape Town. He holds a doctorate from the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa, and worked as a journalist before starting an academic career. He has published widely on media in post-apartheid South Africa. His books include the monograph Tabloid Journalism in South Africa (Indiana University Press, 2010) and the edited collections Chinese Media and Soft Power in Africa: Promotion and Perceptions (with Xiaoling Zhang and Winston Mano, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), Media Ethics and Justice in a Global Age (with Shakuntala Rao, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), Reporting China in Africa (Routledge, 2014), Press Freedom in Africa: Comparative Perspectives (Routledge, 2013), Popular Media: Democracy and Development in Africa (Routledge, 2011), Media Ethics Beyond Borders (with Stephen J. Ward, Routledge, 2010). He edits the journal African Journalism Studies.

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