The Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC)

Philanthropy

Dominant narratives of philanthropy often portray Africans as mere recipients of aid, usually from well-endowed, Western almoners – the West distributing charity to impecunious Africans. The contributors to this volume turn this argument on its head and ask: what about the beneficent spirit of multitudes of Africans whose acts of generosity sustain millions of their compatriots?

This volume is unique in that it illuminates research on philanthropy in Africa by using case studies and ethnographic material to examine a number of themes: cycles of reciprocity among black professionals, social justice philanthropy, community foundations, ubuntu and giving in township and rural settings. Leading thinkers on normative aspects of philanthropy in Africa also critically explore the theories, perspectives and research on philanthropy. This well-researched book will be an invaluable resource to foundations, civil society organisations, researchers, policymakers and students of patterns of giving in South Africa.

Product information

Format : 240mm x 168mm
Pages : 224
ISBN 13 : 978-0-7969-2567-1
Publish Year : December 2016
Rights : World Rights

1. Horizontality, ubuntu and social justice
Shauna Mottiar and Mvuselelo Ngcoya

2. Omnipresent yet invisible: A review of ‘African philanthropy’
Jacob Mwathi Mati

3. Social justice philanthropy in South Africa: Reflecting on the underlying conceptual frameworks
Halima Mahomed

4. Can community foundations re-define the South African development landscape? The Uthungulu and Greater Rustenburg community foundations
Mbizo Edward Sibanda

5. Exploring philanthropic motivations in HIV and AIDS care: Implications for ubuntu and altruism in KwaNgcolosi, KwaZulu-Natal
Annette Kasimbazi, Yvonne Sliep and Christopher John

6. Horizontal philanthropy in Maphumulo and Clermont, Durban
Mvuselelo Ngcoya and Shauna Mottiar

7. Reciprocity as power, influence and obligation: Evidence from using diaries in Gum Tree Road, Cato Crest and Zwelisha, KwaZulu-Natal
Kamna Patel

8. Narrating the gift: Scripting cycles of reciprocity in Gauteng
Carolyn Stauffer

9. Changing direction: Adapting foreign philanthropy to endogenous understandings and practices
Alan Fowler

10. African philanthropy: Advances in the field of horizontal philanthropy
Susan Wilkinson-Maposa

Volume editors

Shauna Mottiar is a senior lecturer in Development Studies at the School of Built Environment and Development Studies, University of KwaZulu-Natal. She holds a PhD in Political Studies from the University of the Witwatersrand. She managed the Centre for Civil Society Philanthropy and Social Entrepreneurship project.

Mvuselelo Ngcoya is a senior lecturer in Development Studies at the School of Built Environment and Development Studies, University of KwaZulu-Natal. He holds a PhD in International Relations from the American University in Washington. His research areas include indigenous food, ubuntu and indigenous knowledge systems.

Contributors

Jacob Mwathi Mati is a lecturer at the School of Social Sciences, University of the South Pacific in Fiji and a research fellow at the Society, Work and Development Institute (SWOP) of the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa.

Halima Mahomed is an independent philanthropy consultant and a member of the Working Group on Philanthropy for Social Justice and Peace and of the Alliance Magazine Editorial Board.

Mbizo Edward Sibanda manages a Global Fund portfolio that focuses on HIV prevention among key populations in South Africa.

Annette Kasimbazi is based at Makerere University and holds a PhD in Health Promotion.

Yvonne Sliep is a critical community health specialist and professor at the School of Psychology, University of KwaZulu-Natal.

Christopher John holds a PhD in Community Development and has a background in community theatre examining HIV and AIDS, informal settlement dwellers, ex-combatants and offenders.

Kamna Patel is a lecturer in Development Studies at the Bartlett Development Planning Unit, University College London, UK.

Carolyn Stauffer teaches in the Department of Applied Social Sciences at Eastern Mennonite University in Virginia, USA, where she has chaired the university’s Humanitarian Action task force and served on the local chapter of UNESCO’s Education for Sustainable Development initiative.

Alan Fowler is a ‘practical academic’ combining experience working with civil society organisations with various academic appointments, as an emeritus professor at the International Institute of Social Studies in the Hague and currently as a visiting professor in African Philanthropy at the Wits Business School.

Susan Wilkinson-Maposa is an independent social development and philanthropy advisor. She holds a PhD in Sociology from the University of Cape Town and is the author of The poor philanthropist: How and why the poor help each other.

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