New  African
About the book
The African Union’s Agenda 2063 is ambitious. It advocates for, among others,
• equitable and people-centred growth and development;
• eradication of poverty;
• development of human capital;
• creation of infrastructure and provision of public goods and services;
• empowerment of women and youth;
• promotion of peace and security, and the strengthening of democratic states, and
• creating participatory and accountable governance institutions.

New African Thinkers: Agenda Africa, 2063 presents the thinking of emerging scholars on these critical issues – those on whose shoulders the responsibility rests for taking this agenda forward. The book will be an essential reference for researchers and educators who are interested in Africa’s developmental path as designed in the Agenda 2063.

Product information

Format : 240mm x 168mm
Pages : 160
ISBN 13 : 978-0-7969-2560-2
Publish Year : January 2017
Rights : World Rights

Content

Preface

Part 1: Peace and Security, including Democracy and Governance
1. Interrogating the relationship between unconstitutional changes of government and illicit drugs in West Africa: The case of Guinea-Bissau and Guinea Conakry Isaac A Aladegbola

2. African electoral conflicts: Conditioning and triggering factors
Aondowase Nyam

3. A contradiction in conflict: Armed non-state actors that contribute to security in Africa
Lize-Marié Visagie

Part 2: Gender and Global Change
4. A gendered analytical perspective of adaptation policies and strategies in Africa
Matilda Azong

5. Assessing gendered vulnerability to climate change in Nzhelele, Limpopo Province Jestina Chineka, Agnes Musyoki, Edmore Kori and Hector Chikoore

6. The right to landscape: Facing climate change and a gendered political economy through ‘pastoralist’ peace-building in Somalia
Tamara Naidoo

7. Transformational development: The nexus between biodiversity and the trade in traditional medicine in South Africa
Sibusiso G Nkosi

Part 3: Development for the People
8. The contribution of corporate social investment to sustainable cultural heritage resource management in Botswana: The case of Debswana Diamond Mining Company
Olivia Molefe

Part 4: Science and Technology
9. Information and communications technology distribution inequalities in rural South Africa
Kgabo H Ramoroka

10. Converting municipal solid waste into energy in Africa
Portia Tshigoli

Contributors

Index

Contributors

Isaac A Aladegbola is a lecturer in the Department of Political Science at the Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti in Nigeria.

Matilda Azong is a GIS specialist preparing her PhD in the Department of Geography, Energy Studies and Environmental Management at the University of Johannesburg, South Africa.

Hector Chikoore is a meteorologist and climatology lecturer in the Department of Geography and Geo-Information Sciences at the University of Venda, South Africa.

Jestina Chineka is a PhD student in the Department of Geography and Geo-Information Sciences at the University of Venda, South Africa.

Edmore Kori is a lecturer in physical geography in the Department of Geography and Geo-Information Sciences at the University of Venda, South Africa.

Olivia Molefe is an independent researcher in sustainable development and cultural heritage resource management. She is an advisor to the Botswana National Commission for UNESCO Youth forum.

Agnes Musyoki is a professor specializing in human and economic geography in the Department of Geography and Geo-Information Sciences at the University of Venda, South Africa.

Tamara Naidoo is the Deputy Manager (Research, Development and Coordination) at the Southern African Liaison Office. She has recently completed her MPhil at the University of Pretoria, South Africa.

Sibusiso G Nkosi is a Monitoring and Evaluation Consultant at the Institute for Security Studies in South Africa. Previously he was an intern at the Africa Institute of South Africa in the Human Sciences Research Council.

Aondowase Nyam works as Assistant Director at the Bureau of Service Welfare, Benue State in Nigeria. He has recently completed his PhD at the University of Pretoria, South Africa.

Kgabo H Ramoroka is a PhD research intern in the Economic Performance and Development programme at the Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa.

Portia Tshigoli is an independent GIS researcher; she was previously an intern at the Africa Institute of South Africa in the Human Sciences Research Council.

Lize-Marié Visagie is pursuing her PhD at the University of South Africa. She lectures political science and international political economy at the Midrand Graduate Institute, South Africa.

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